"There is always a philosophy for lack of courage."—Albert Camus

Friday, November 04, 2005

Christianity Today on Baylor's New President

Because Christianity Today's weblog doesn't isolate individual blog topics, I'll reproduce their post in full for your convenience:

Baylor's new president

Those of you who have watched the Battle for Baylor will be interested to learn that the university has a new president. It's John Lilley, who previously led the University of Nevada at Reno and Pennsylvania State University-Erie. He's a Baylor grad, but perhaps not a Baptist. In Erie, he was a ruling elder of the First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant, a PCUSA church. But the Baylor press release says "While a student at Baylor and USC, Dr. Lilley, a licensed Baptist minister, served as minister of music at two Baptist churches." He told today's press conference that he'll be attending First Baptist.

Weblog doesn't know much about him, but it's worth noting that Hunter Baker, who has written on Baylor fights for Christianity Today, says, "He will be in favor of the faith-learning integration project already underway and will continue on the path to making Baylor a true research university."

Also, it's worth noting that the BaylorFans message board, largely populated by the kinds of people who thought that former Baylor president Robert Sloan was a "fundamentalist" bent on destroying the university, is generally upset with the appointment.

So it sounds like good news. But we'll withhold judgment until we can actually do some reporting on this.

Just to be clear, CT misquoted me slightly. I prefaced the remark above by saying it was based on what I've heard so far from scattered sources. Nevertheless, I've seen the new president's first press conference and thought it was great stuff. The board seems to have unearthed a gem. I liked what John Lilley had to say very much.

Now, let's see what he does about picking a Provost.

8 comments:

Tom Van Dyke said...

Hunter Baker, who has written on Baylor fights for Christianity Today, says, "He will be in favor of the faith-learning integration project already underway..."

It would be consistent with Baylor's mission if folks actually learned about the Christian faith before they reject it. I mean, I can handle it if they do.

But I for one am weary of arguing the Bible with those who do not understand it, let alone with those who have not even read it.

Would you discuss Shakespeare with someone who only got the Cliff's Notes? Only if you were a fool yourself.

Well explained, Mr. Baker.

Amy & Jordan said...

Tom,

I think Aquinas would "feel your pain," so to speak:
However, it is to be borne in mind, in regard to the philosophical sciences, that the inferior sciences neither prove their principles nor dispute with those who deny them, but leave this to a higher science; whereas the highest of them, viz. metaphysics, can dispute with one who denies its principles, if only the opponent will make some concession; but if he concede nothing, it can have no dispute with him, though it can answer his objections. Hence Sacred Scripture, since it has no science above itself, can dispute with one who denies its principles only if the opponent admits some at least of the truths obtained through divine revelation; thus we can argue with heretics from texts in Holy Writ, and against those who deny one article of faith, we can argue from another. If our opponent believes nothing of divine revelation, there is no longer any means of proving the articles of faith by reasoning, but only of answering his objections---if he has any---against faith. Since faith rests upon infallible truth, and since the contrary of a truth can never be demonstrated, it is clear that the arguments brought against faith cannot be demonstrations, but are difficulties that can be answered. (ST I.1.8)

Visit the PowerBlog...

Tom Van Dyke said...

A&J---

How did you so thoroughly figure out how to ring my bell? Not only by penetrating my Achilles' Heel of Thomas Aquinas, but by quoting him so aptly?

Your website is full of delights, and even if you're some sort of cult, count me as signed up. I won't give you any money, but if you want to dress me up in funny robes to sell flowers at the airport, I'm down with that.

You folks are gooooooooood. Send the van for me in the morning.

Hunter Baker said...

Tom, the Acton Institute folks would never send you a van. They'd give you a micro-loan and get you started in your own business in Guatemala.

Let me tell you, Acton is GOOD. Great, great organization. Jordan Ballor's blog is worth visiting regularly too.

Amy & Jordan said...

Thanks for the kind words. It's a passage that has stuck in my head since I've read it, since it so pertinent to a number of points: apologetical tactics, blowing up the "rationalism" of Aquinas fallacy, and so on.

And since I'll never bother to get a separate blogger account, my wife will always be co-author of any comments here!

Tom Van Dyke said...

Yes, it's all wonderful stuff, Hunter, and I shall read Jordan, et al., regularly.

In fact, I think it's overdue that we reciprocate their courtesy and add The Acton Institute to our own blogroll. ;-)

Hunter Baker said...

I thought that, too.

mjwatson said...

Long live 2012!

Acton is fantastic, I have nothing but good things to say about them.