"There is always a philosophy for lack of courage."—Albert Camus

Sunday, September 11, 2005

History

There are those who say quite rightly
That we ought to tell tales nightly
To all who are young and spritely
With a tone that may feather lightly
Through the ears and into the heart,
So they find even in life's fresh start
Their moment plays in history a part
Whether through craft or inspired art.
That God with Nature does distribute
To each alone their unique attribute
So they may to the world contribute
All for His ultimate glory and tribute.
Oh, kings of yore mightily clashed
Great civilizations duly smashed
Pretenders like lightning flashed
Dreamers found ambition slashed.
The line of progress did relentless move
Today's rut had been yesterday's groove
Only what helped all the world improve
Did its virtue by hardy endurance prove.

2 comments:

Tom Van Dyke said...

Today's rut had been yesterday's groove...

Nice.

Conservatism is out of fashion in the arts for the past 400 yrs or so. Of course, the epic poets were essentially conservative and told their societies their myths, to inspire the contemporary generation toward the greatness that was required of their forebears that built the great houses in which their children's children found themselves luckily inhabiting.

But the counterculture is our culture these days, and our myths are deconstructed: the American experiment was set up with a lot of highfallutin talk by selfish bastards who meant it only to apply to themselves; even Lincoln didn't free the slaves, really. A quarter million Union soldiers died to preserve tariffs.

We come to see ourselves as simply renters in a very rotten house. We have no stake in it, and it would be better torn down or washed away. We shall raise our hands to further the former, and not lift a finger to prevent the latter.

So when we see Lord of the Flies played out in a disaster area, it is no surprise. When the levee breaks, we find ourselves once again back in the primordial ooze.

Perhaps Plato was right and our poets are to blame, present company excepted.

Jay D. Homnick said...

Apparently, Lord of the Flies happened because they were counting on the Ford of the Lies. Which symbolizes your point.