"There is always a philosophy for lack of courage."—Albert Camus

Friday, July 01, 2005

Great Interview with Christian Movie Producer

Ralph Winter is the producer of both X-Men films and the upcoming Fantastic Four. He is also a Christian.

Christianity Today has a great interview where you can get to know him.

Something that really impressed me is how well Winter sizes up the film American Beauty and the oft-wrongheaded Christian opposition to that movie.

As the original super blogger Instapundit likes to say, "Read the whole thing."

5 comments:

John Huisman said...

I can see why Winter would think that "American Beauty" gives us a deeper insight into the Bible. The Ricky Fitts character in particular well illustrates that the beauty of the transcendent is revealed in the ordinary (or tragic) things of life and can be experienced. I can also see why many Christians rejected the film. Although experientially sensitive to the transcendent, Fitts has no real knowledge of who it is or the implications thereof. "American Beauty" can give insights into the Bible, but it takes the Bible to properly assess what "American Beauty" touches upon.

Hunter Baker said...

My overwhelming feeling about the film was that it showed a man indulging himself with utter disregard for his family or any moral compass who then experiences a complete transformation literally just in time. It felt like Christian conversion to me. I had a strong intuition the scriptwriter was engaging in "pre-evangelism" by tilling the soil to receive the seed of the gospel.

HB

Tlaloc said...

"My overwhelming feeling about the film was that it showed a man indulging himself with utter disregard for his family or any moral compass who then experiences a complete transformation literally just in time."

Interesting, I didn't see that at all. What I saw was a man who shed all the ridiculous expectations of society of others in order to be himself. At first he fixates on the girl thinking that what he wants is to be with her, but what he really wants is just to be himself. Free of the nagging manipulative wife. Free of the job he hates and knows to be unethical. Free of the societal strictures that have no real meaning in the face of individual ethos.

Much like the Matrix the story is adaptable enough for people to see what they want.

Hunter Baker said...

What do you make of his sudden fatherly care for the girl? What about his loving look at the picture of his family (from the bad old days of restriction)? He's passed through the "me" phase and is on his way back before he's destroyed.

Tlaloc said...

"What do you make of his sudden fatherly care for the girl?"

I see it as his realization that this was never really about her, that he fixated on her as a way out but now that he's free he doesn't actually need her as a sexual image. She can just be a human being.



"What about his loving look at the picture of his family (from the bad old days of restriction)?"

Don't recall that scene but off the top of my head it can be a reflection on the challenge overcome (living according to the expectations of others instead of being true to yourself).



"He's passed through the "me" phase and is on his way back before he's destroyed."

I have trouble seeing that because at no point in the movie does he show any regret over his path, instead he seems very satisfied with having made the break with his former controlled state.